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2010 October

WFMY News 2

Triad Invention Could Wipe Out the Light Bulb

Researchers at the Center of Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials at Wake Forest say the light source doesn’t get hot, won’t break, can last longer than an average light bulb and could lower your power bill. Head researcher Dave Carroll said, “This is a light bulb and most of the light bulb here is actually the glass that holds it. The part that lights up is an extremely thin layer.”

Reuters

Horror Movies this Halloween give Insight into Human Nature

This Halloween, as people watch horror films–from the earliest films to modern remakes–viewers will be frightened by a sense of vulnerability, says Wake Forest University communication professor Mary Dalton.

YubaNet.com

The Scary New American Cemetery: The Death of Individual Burial Choice and Custom

According to Wake Forest University legal scholar Tanya Marsh, these traditional and personal burial customs are increasingly being replaced with corporate-style conformity in modern cemeteries, where maximizing efficiency and profits is radically changing the look and feel of American cemeteries.

The Arizona Republic

Facebook, Other Social Media Give Users ‘Persona’ Power

“People who are on Facebook occasionally go on and post status updates, like ‘I am having a bad day’ or ‘I like this music group,’ ” says Ananda Mitra, communication professor at Wake Forest University in North Carolina. “They might not be conscious of it, but at that very moment, they have described themselves, and anyone who stumbles on that page would immediately create (a mental picture of) them.”

Celebrating A.R. Ammons

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“Single Threads Unbraided,” a celebration of the work of poet A.R. Ammons will be held Nov. 15 – 16 at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library.  The symposium will examine Ammons’ poetry, art and letters as well as his contributions to American culture and the arts.

Twice the winner of the National Book Award for his poetry, Ammons was a 1949 Wake Forest graduate. He was also a prolific painter. Twenty of his brightly colored abstract paintings will be on display in the library in conjunction with the event and will then have a permanent home in the library.

Ammons was a native of southeastern North Carolina, but was, for many years, the Goldwin Smith Professor of Poetry at Cornell University. He died in 2001.

>>Schedule of events

Clothesline Project for human rights awareness

hands-on-world1Members of the community will be painting T-shirts on October 21 to air concerns about human rights violations. The shirts will be hung on Manchester Plaza as part of the Human Rights Clothesline Project.

Students in Patricia Willis’ course on human rights are organizing the event, which is sponsored by the women’s and gender studies program.

“In the U.S., we don’t always understand the importance of human rights work domestically and globally because we tend to reject international law and the necessity for its application in the U.S.,” says Patricia Willis, activist-in-residency in the women’s and gender studies program.

Racial profiling, inadequate housing, unequal schooling opportunities, food injustice, rights of migrant workers, poverty, discrimination against women, and abuse of children are just a few examples of the issues surrounding human rights for people who live in one of the wealthiest democracies in the world, Willis says.

“The Human Rights Clothesline Project is important to the community because it’s not enough just to talk about human rights. We need to really get in there and show people what’s going on in the United States and abroad,” says senior political science major Maggie Ryan. “It’s also an opportunity for people to express their views and frustrations with the current state of human rights around the world and talk about topics that can be difficult to discuss.”

The event is scheduled from 11 am – 2:30 pm. Rain postpones.

Feisty students launch coffee business

coffeeCollege students and coffee are a quintessential combination. But how many have tried to secure a great cup of java by roasting coffee beans in a hot-air popcorn popper? Senior JT Peifer has.

His passion for coffee led him to launch Feisty Goat Coffee Roasters. In the early morning before opening Campus Grounds, the student-run coffee shop in Taylor Residence Hall that he manages, he roasts and grinds exotic coffee beans. His business partner and fellow coffee enthusiast Kari Heuer handles the sales, financial operations and customer service side of the business.

“Ever since my first cup in fifth grade, coffee has been a passion of mine,” says Peifer. “The entire enterprise of coffee fascinates me.”

“Entrepreneurship is often about developing successful ventures from personal passions,” says John Ceneviva, entrepreneur-in-residence at the Center for Entrepreneurship, who assisted in securing funding for Feisty Goat. “Peifer has tapped into a trend in coffee for super-premium quality, a product that is not readily available to consumers in general, and in particular to Wake Forest students.”