2014 April

Research shows breeding down among blue-footed boobies in the Galápagos

A new study published in Avian Conservation and Ecology and featured in National Geographic shows the population of blue-footed boobies in the Galápagos Islands has dropped from around 20,000 in the 1960s to 6,400 today. At the same time that breeding has declined, the number of sardines has also decreased—and past research has shown that successful booby breeding occurs when the birds’ diet is made up almost completely of sardines.

Now Wake Forest biologist Dave Anderson, the lead investigator in the study, says he and his research team see studying sardines as an important next step.

“Understanding the population dynamics and distribution of sardines in Galápagos is a logical follow-up project—essentially nothing is known at present,” Anderson told National Geographic’s Mark Miller.

If the numbers of offspring continue to drop this will create a population of birds in about ten years “that are not so old that they up and die, but are too old to breed effectively,” Anderson said. “A lot of 70-year-old humans would be an apt analogy.”

From USA Today to The New York Times Wake Forest is making news

During the first quarter of 2014, Wake Forest University experts were featured in national news outlets from CNN to The Washington Post to Yahoo! to ABC and The New York Times. Wake Forest News (PDF) features national and local news clips, and campus highlights.

Why unionizing college sports is a bad call

Why unionizing college sports is a bad call: In an op-ed appearing in the Wall Street Journal, Nathan Hatch, president of Wake Forest and chairman of the NCAA Division I board of directors and Lou Anna Simon, president of Michigan State University and chairwoman of the NCAA executive committee express concern over the move to unionize college athletics. “We oppose the effort to bring labor unions into college sports. One group of athletes is not more hardworking, more dedicated or more driven than another. Unionization will create unequal treatment not only among student-athletes competing in different sports, but, quite possibly, even among student-athletes on the same team.…To call student-athletes employees is an affront to those players who are taking full advantage of the opportunity to get an education.”

WFU business school ranks #1 in academic quality

Bloomberg Businessweek ranked Wake Forest University’s undergraduate business program first in the nation for academic quality for the sixth consecutive year and 11th overall. “The Best Undergraduate Business Schools” ranking report was released on April 4. The Wake Forest University School of Business improved significantly in student satisfaction and recruiter sentiment to drive the ranking up 7 spots from 18th overall in 2013.

“The combination of a rigorous education and hands-on internship experience prepares students to succeed in their new careers,” said Dean of Business Steve Reinemund. “We are very proud to achieve the top academic quality rank for the sixth consecutive year, and applaud our hard-working students and dedicated faculty and staff for this achievement.”